What Does This Picture Say?

I’ll welcome all comments, especially the negative ones and I won’t delete them. Yep, thats me way back in the day posing with an M12A2 assault rifle and kneeling in front of a Confederate Battle Flag. Does this mean I’m an evil, racist person because I am with a flag? Tell me what ya’ll think and I’ll give you the rest of the story tomorrow…

Sorry the pic is really old and done with a Kodak instamatic.

OPFOR MISSION HAWAII 2 1989

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8 responses to “What Does This Picture Say?

  1. My thoughts:
    Flag, t-shirt, banner, dress style…. who cares, it’s the person that counts.
    I am a Muslim, but I don’t believe in killing for my beliefs.
    My brother is a Christian, but never raises a finger to help his neighbour.
    I’ve met many refugees from Syria (we have 1.5 Million here in Türkiye), but most don’t ask for anything.
    I’ve met locals here who’d sell their own Grandma, twice…
    So my point is, as I suspect you will go to say tomorrow, the flag is NOT the issue, dickheads with guns, mixed with abhorrent violent racist views are the issue.

  2. airbrush history and you delete what led to where you are – the flag is only a red rag to bullsh*t – otherwise it is as harmless or as proud as you want it to be.

  3. Hmmmm. To me, the flag is a symbol of a regional historical culture, a time when success in the south (region) was tied to plantations, often growing a commodity (cotton for example) in world wide demand, but (the success) sustainable only by the common practice of “slavery.” Today, that word, (slavery) and any reference to the degradation of another human is generally unacceptable (That’s a good thing,)
    As for your presence with the weapon (a weapon of questionable connection to the historical meaning of the flag,) maybe you were in Viet Nam, serving a common purpose with service men from the south,) Maybe you were making a statement of which I don’t understand. Maybe you were goofing around. I have no idea. Maybe you were young and it was a time when the division of the north and south was still in a healing process. (In the 1960’s many younger people still had not too distant relitives who fought and died for the flag, a regional symbol of belonging.)
    Today, especially today, the flag’s meaning has morphed (with the help of media sensationalism) into a symbol of shame. Maybe for good reason, maybe for no reason. Maybe simply misinterpreted from a benign historical symbol of pride, to a racial moniker.
    Looking forward to your take.

  4. Go Rebels!!! Sorry, I couldn’t really judge my response to this particular picture, set in this particular time because of what’s going on in our nation right now. The fact is that when I see this flag these days, I think about the fact that we are in such serious trouble in this nation, with the same kind of severe head-to-head confrontations between central government and states — and a citizenry that is becoming more afraid of their own government than they are enemies from abroad — that I sometimes wonder how close we are to another civil war.

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